The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (2023)

Here’s a small secret about the Spanish conditional tense. Ready?

The Spanish conditional tense is… fácil. It’s easy. 😊

When you compare it with the four tenses used to describe the past in Spanish and the subjunctive mood, the conditional tense is easy to conjugate and easier to use.

Just like the future tense, you should have no trouble understanding it with a little practice.

Of course, when you’re first introduced to any tense, it might take a bit of time to understand it. But the conditional tense is simple!

If you’d like to develop your understanding of the conditional tense, this post is where you’ll get the facts. And, note that this article does go into the subjunctive tense towards the end.

But let’s kick things off nice and simple by first outlining what the Spanish conditional tense is.

What is the Spanish conditional tense?

We use the Spanish conditional tense when describing situations that could (podría), would (haría) or should (debería) occur in certain circumstances.

To start with, here’s a quick example of the conditional tense being used in English:

I would love to visit several countries around the world, no doubt about it!

The word ‘would’ in the above sentence is one example of the conditional tense. This sentence can take on a different meaning with different conditional words. For example, compare the first example with these two following sentences:

I should visit several countries around the world, no doubt about it!

I could visit several countries around the world, no doubt about it!

The first of these sentences suggest that the speaker ought to visit several countries, while the second suggests they can visit several countries.

Nonetheless, they are all conditional tenses in English, which occur in certain situations (in this case, travelling around the world regardless of what other people might think).

So now let’s take a look at how these sentences would look in Spanish:

Me encantaría visitar varios países del mundo, ¡sin duda!

Debería visitar varios países del mundo, ¡sin duda!

Podría visitar varios países del mundo, ¡sin duda!

As with the English examples, all of these sentences use the conditional tense, which is indicated by the verbs at the beginning of each sentence - encantaría, debería and podría.

Now, if you noticed a pattern between those three verbs, that will give you a head start with the following section.

Vamos allá (let’s continue)!

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How do you conjugate the Spanish simple conditional tense?

The pattern between all three verbs in the previous section is one way to understand how to conjugate the Spanish conditional tense.

All Spanish verbs in the conditional tense have particular verb endings.

If you wanted to say ‘they should go to the beach’ in Spanish, you would need to conjugate the verb deber (the Spanish verb for ‘should’) using the correct ending that corresponds to the right pronoun.

Here’s how you would say this in Spanish:

Deberían ir a la playa.

For the Spanish conditional tense, there are regular and irregular verb conjugations to be aware of.

Regular Spanish simple conditional tense conjugations

Regular Spanish simple conditional tense verbs are ‘regular’ because their infinitive stem doesn’t change when you’re conjugating them.

To clarify the concept of simple conditional tense verb conjugation, take a look at the following table.

It contains the endings required to correctly conjugate regular verbs in the Spanish conditional simple tense:

Personal pronoun (English / Spanish)Conditional Suffix
I yo-ía
You tú-ías
You, he, she, usted, él, ella-ía
We nosotros-íamos
You (all), vosotros-íais
You, they, they ustedes, ellos, ellas-ían

If you wanted to say ‘all of you should eat less sugar each day and night and exercise more regularly’, the regular conditional verb deber in its conjugated form should be used.

Because it is classed as a regular, you can simply look at the table above for the correct ending that corresponds to the right pronoun ‘you all’ (which would be the Spanish pronoun vosotros).

Here’s how to say the above sentence in Spanish:

*Deberíais comer menos azúcar cada día y noche y hacer ejercicio con más frecuencia.*

(Video) When to use the Spanish subjunctive or The Conditional Tense in Spanish

Irregular Spanish simple conditional tense conjugations

Let’s now focus on the irregular Spanish simple conditional tense conjugations.

These are different to the regular ones and slightly trickier to understand.

For irregular Spanish simple conditional tense conjugations, the stem (or infinitive verb) does change, and you must add the correct ending as well. For this reason, different rules apply to irregular Spanish conditional verbs.

A few of the most frequently-used irregular conditional Spanish verbs include:

  • Haber (to have)
  • Querer (to want)
  • Tener (to have)
  • Poner (to put)
  • Salir (to leave)
  • Venir (to come)
  • Saber (to know)
  • Caber (to fit)

If you wanted to conjugate these verbs, here is how these infinitive stems would change:

  • Haber becomes habr + conditional verb ending
  • Querer becomes querr + conditional verb ending
  • Tener becomes tendr + conditional verb ending
  • Poner becomes pondr + conditional verb ending
  • Salir becomes saldr + conditional verb ending
  • Venir becomes vendr + conditional verb ending
  • Saber becomes sab + conditional verb ending
  • Caber becomes cabr + conditional verb ending

To make this clearer, let’s have a look at the conjugated conditional forms of querer and salir.

Personal pronounConditional (querer)Conditional (salir)
yoquerríasaldría
querríassaldrías
usted, él, ellaquerríasaldría
nosotrosquerríamossaldríamos
vosotrosquerríaissaldríais
ustedes, ellos, ellasquerríansaldrían

All of these irregular conditional verbs in their conjugated forms use the roots listed above.

In other words, the conditional yo form of the verb querer would not be ‘querería’.

The root must change to the irregular form listed above, to give us querría instead.

There’s one other thing to keep in mind about the verb querer. Its conditional form is similar to its imperfect past tense. When you conjugate the imperfect past tense of querer, the root only contains one r.

The imperfect past tense of querer is quería, while the conditional tense (as mentioned) is querría.

What is the conditional si?

In Spanish, there is a little word that can be used to form conditional sentences.

This little word is si (without an accent mark). Si - (not ) means ‘if’.

It is used in a similar way to the English equivalent of the word.

Take a look at the following example to find out how si is used:

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (1)

Si tenemos tiempo, vamos al parque Santa Margarita con tus primos y amigos.

If we have time, we will go to the Saint Margarita park with your cousins and friends.

Just like that, we can form a conditional sentence using the conditional si.

Sentences like these have the main action that depends on certain conditions.

In this case, the main action is ‘going to the park’, and the condition is ‘if they have time’.

Take note of the difference between si and . The only orthographical difference is the accent mark. But this accent mark means the difference between saying ‘if’ and ‘yes’.

Here’s how the above example would change if we used the accent mark:

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (2)

Sí tenemos tiempo, vamos al parque con tus primos y amigos.

Yes, we have time, we will go to the park with your cousins and friends.

This changes things significantly, doesn’t it? The sentence is no longer conditional.

So, the key thing here is to remember your accent marks in all situations and when you’re using the conditional si.

What is the Spanish continuous conditional tense?

The Spanish continuous conditional tense is used to mention actions that you would be continuously doing in certain situations.

Here is an example in English:

I guessed you would be eating custard tarts and scones for breakfast

The phrase ‘would be eating’ is the continuous conditional tense being used in English.

(Video) Understanding the Conditional Tense in Spanish | The Language Tutor *Lesson 52*

Here are a few examples of the continuous conditional tense being used in Spanish.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (3)

Pensé que estarías durmiendo la siesta a las cinco y media.

I thought you would be napping at five thirty.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (4)

No sabía que su mujer estaría hablando por teléfono al medico a estas horas.

He didn’t know that his wife would be speaking on the phone to the doctor at this time.

How do you form the Spanish continuous conditional tense?

We form the Spanish continuous conditional tense using a verb in the conditional tense and a verb in its gerund form.

Use the following formula to remember this:

Conditional verb + verb in gerund form

You can take a look at the table in the previous section to see how to conjugate a conditional verb. Then, to add a regular verb in its gerund form, take an infinitive verb, remove the AR, ER or IR and add -ando or -iendo to the end.

Use -ando for verbs ending in AR, and -iendo for EI or IR verbs.

The table below shows how we conjugate AR, ER and IR verbs in the gerund form:

In the same way that some conditional verbs have irregular stems, some verbs have an irregular stem that you will have to remember when making the gerund form.

One example of this is the verb dormir.

When conjugated in its gerund form, you need to replace the o with u and the ir with the gerund suffix -iendo.

How to use the Spanish conditional tense with the imperfect subjunctive

Now we will take things up a notch and introduce the subjunctive mood.

The conditional tense can combine with the imperfect subjunctive mood to describe an outcome that can happen but is hypothetical.

Conditional/subjunctive sentence formula

To combine the subjunctive mood with the conditional, you can use this formula to construct sentences:

Conditional verb + si + imperfect subjunctive tense

But, to clarify the use of this formula slightly more, here is an example sentence to help you:

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (5)

Perderías cinco kilos si corrieras dos kilómetros y medio cada día.

You would lose five kilograms if you ran two and a half kilometres each day.

In this example, we have a conditional verb perderías, the conditional si and the imperfect subjunctive tense corrieras. Now, as this is a beginner’s guide, we won’t dive into the imperfect subjunctive mood too much.

But take a look at this article on the Spanish subjunctive for more information.

The formula can work the opposite way as well, so you can invert sentences and change their structure using this formula too:

Si + imperfect subjunctive tense + conditional verb

Our example above would then become:

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (6)

Si corrieras dos kilómetros y medio cada día, perderías cinco kilos.

If you ran two and a half kilometers each day, you would lose five kilograms.

(Video) How to use the (future) conditional tense in Spanish: easy animated explanation for beginners.

More examples of the conditional tense and the imperfect subjunctive

Here are a few other examples of the conditional tense and the imperfect subjunctive combined. Can you spot the conditional verb?

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (7)

Llegarías a la oficina a tiempo si no durmieras tanto cada mañana.

You would arrive at the office on time if you didn’t sleep so much every morning.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (8)

No ganarías mucho dinero si no trabajaras hasta las doce y cuarto de la noche.

You wouldn't make much money if you didn't work until a quarter past midnight.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (9)

Si creciera el árbol en el jardín, tendría muchas manzanas.

If the tree grew in the garden, I would have many apples.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (10)

Si tuvierais doscientos mil euros, compraríais un chalet muy grande con ventanas grandes.

If you had two hundred thousand euros, you would buy a very big villa with large windows.

What is the Spanish perfect conditional (compound) tense?

So far, we have focused on the simple conditional tense, but there is also a perfect conditional tense that we have yet to explore.

The Spanish perfect conditional tense in English is the same as saying ‘would have’.

It is a conditional used for the past.

To say ‘would have’ in Spanish, we use the conditional conjugated form of the Spanish verb haber. But the conditional verb is normally paired with a verb in its past participle form.

Perfect conditional (compound) formula

The formula you should use to form the perfect conditional tense is:

Haber (in its conditional verb form) + A verb in its past participle form

To say ‘I would have been happy today if my present had arrived in the mail’, we would use the formula above to create the structure of the sentence.

Habría estado feliz hoy si mi regalo hubiera llegado al correo.

Notice the perfect conditional compound at the beginning of the sentence - habría estado.

Conjugating haber in the conditional tense

Now, you’re going to need to know how to conjugate haber in the conditional tense to use the perfect conditional compound in sentences. Here’s how to do it:

Personal pronounConditional (haber)
yohabría
habrías
usted, él, ellahabría
nosotroshabríamos
vosotroshabríais
ustedes, ellos, ellashabrían
(Video) Spanish Conditional Tense | Basic Spanish 101

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Just take the root habr- and add the conditional verb endings to form the conditional tense.

How to use the perfect conditional tense and the past perfect subjunctive

We use the perfect conditional tense when describing an action that didn’t occur but could have occurred under certain conditions in the past.

It is used alongside the past perfect subjunctive and features the conditional si.

In our example above, the past perfect subjunctive is the compound verb hubiera llegado.

To form the past perfect subjunctive, just conjugate the verb haber in its perfect subjunctive tense and follow it with a verb in its past participle form.

To conjugate the verb haber in its past perfect subjunctive form, take a look at the table below.

Personal PronounHaber (past)
yoHubiera/hubiese
tuHubieras/hubieses
Usted, él, ellaHubiera/hubiese
nosotrosHubiéramos/hubiésemos
vosotrosHubierais/hubieseis
ustedes, ellos, ellasHubieran/hubiesen

Examples of the perfect conditional tense and the past perfect subjunctive

Here are a few examples of the conditional tense being used with the past perfect subjunctive. Can you spot the conditional verbs?

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (11)

Si hubiera enterado antes que tuviste un ataque al corazón, habría venido al hospital antes.

If I had known before that you had a heart attack, I would have come to the hospital before.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (12)

Si no hubiera comido tanto antes de nadar, no habría tenido dolor del estómago.

If I hadn’t eaten so much before swimming, I wouldn’t have had a stomach ache.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (13)

No te habría llamado tan temprano si hubiera sabido que estabas durmiendo.

I wouldn’t have called you so early if I had known you were sleeping.

The Conditional Tense In Spanish: How And When To Use It (14)

Si habrían celebrado la boda públicamente, no hubieran tenido tranquilidad.

If they had celebrated the wedding publicly, they would not have had peace of mind.

Practice with verb exercises and resources to understand the conditional tense

When trying to understand the conditional tense, start by focusing on the simple conditional tense.

Start with the definitions of the key conditional verbs:

  • Deber
  • Poder
  • Haber
  • Hacer

Learn how to conjugate regular and irregular verbs, but don’t forget to listen to how they are used by native speakers.

As soon as you’ve mastered the conjugations, complete some verb exercises similar to the ones you’ll get in a Spanish course to help you practice.

With time you will notice how simple the conditional Spanish tense is.

What advice would you like to share about learning the conditional tense in Spanish?

Write your contribution below in the comments section!

FAQs

How do you know when to use conditional tense in Spanish? ›

When to Use the Conditional Tense in Spanish
  1. To express what you would do in the future, if you could. ...
  2. To talk about something that will probably never happen (but you would love it to) ...
  3. To give advice or ask for some. ...
  4. To express politeness. ...
  5. To talk about the future in the past. ...
  6. In the Spanish si clauses.
8 Jan 2021

What is an example of conditional tense in Spanish? ›

For example, "would go" is like the Spanish conditional tense in the sentence "If it were to rain I would go with you" but is like the Spanish imperfect tense in "When we were lived in Madrid I would go with you." In the first sentence, "would go" is conditioned on the rain, but in the second section "would go" refers ...

How do you explain conditional in Spanish? ›

The conditional tense is used to describe what someone would do or what would happen in the future. It can also be used to express ambitions and intentions. For example: Mi colegio ideal tendría una piscina (My ideal school would have a swimming pool).

How do you do conditional tense? ›

How to form the conditional tense. To form the conditional tense, we need to add the imperfect endings to the future stem (ie with regular -er and -ir verbs the endings are added directly to the infinitive of the verb, and with regular -re verbs, take the final -e off the infinitive and add the endings).

What is the difference between conditional and future tense in Spanish? ›

The Spanish future tense (el futuro simple) and the conditional tense (el condicional simple) both talk about future actions, but with one key difference: the future tense refers to the concrete whereas the conditional refers to the hypothetical.

Would conditional sentences examples? ›

Examples
  • If it had rained, you would have gotten wet.
  • You would have gotten wet if it had rained.
  • You would have passed your exam if you had worked harder.
  • If you had worked harder, you would have passed your exam.
  • I would have believed you if you hadn't lied to me before.

What are the 3 types of conditional? ›

Conditional
Conditional sentence typeUsageIf clause verb tense
ZeroGeneral truthsSimple present
Type 1A possible condition and its probable resultSimple present
Type 2A hypothetical condition and its probable resultSimple past
Type 3An unreal past condition and its probable result in the pastPast perfect
1 more row

What is the conditional form of a verb? ›

Conditional verbs are used to create conditional sentences, which express hypothetical or unlikely situations. Conditional verbs can be used in the past, present, or future tense, and auxiliary verbs like can/could, will/would, and may/might are important in forming conditionals.

What is the conditional perfect tense in Spanish? ›

The Spanish conditional perfect tense is used to describe something that could have happened in the past but did not due to another event. In some cases it can also imply the probability that this event will happen eventually.

What is simple conditional? ›

Conditional simple is a form used to refer to a hypothetical state of affairs, or an uncertain event that is contingent on another set of circumstances. It is formed as follows: Would + Verb. The modal 'would' can be replaced with could, might and should: could do.

Can you use the conditional in the past in Spanish? ›

Spanish conditionals are used to talk about things that are hypothetical, things that could be or could have been. Like in English, Spanish conditionals can indicate varying degrees of possibility in the present, future and past.

What is the stem of the verb poner in the conditional tense? ›

Mode: Conditional
Personal PronounConjugation
Yopondría
Tupondrías
El/Ellapondría
Nosotrospondríamos
2 more rows

What is conditional tense and its examples? ›

Look at the following examples: If you had told me you needed a ride, I would have left earlier. If I had cleaned the house, I could have gone to the movies. These sentences express a condition that was likely enough, but did not actually happen in the past.

What are the 4 types of conditional sentences? ›

There are four main kinds of conditionals:
  • The Zero Conditional: (if + present simple, ... present simple) ...
  • The First Conditional: (if + present simple, ... will + infinitive) ...
  • The Second Conditional: (if + past simple, ... would + infinitive) ...
  • The Third Conditional. (if + past perfect, ... would + have + past participle)

What is present conditional tense? ›

The Present Conditional. The present conditional describes a situation now that isn't true or isn't happening. Teachers also call this the present unreal or present contrary-to-fact. Example: If I had a million dollars, I would give it away to all my friends.

How many irregular verbs are in the conditional tense in Spanish? ›

There are only 12 irregular verbs for the conditional tense in Spanish. As the Spanish future tense is formed in exactly the same way as the Spanish conditional tense, these 12 irregular verbs apply equally to both tenses.

What is the difference between conditional and imperfect Spanish? ›

Frequently, the conditional is used to express probability, possibility, wonder or conjecture, and is usually translated as would, could, must have or probably. Note: when “would” is used in the sense of a repeated action in the past, the imperfect is used. Here are the previous examples, translated to Spanish.

Where do we use would and will? ›

The word 'will' is generally used as a modal verb, but it can also be used as a noun. 'Would' is also a modal verb and is the past tense of will. Another difference between 'will' and 'would' is that 'will' is used in statements that refer to the future while 'would' is used to refer events to the past.

What are the 5 types of conditionals? ›

We will see five conditionals: zero, first, second, third and mixed. A conditional sentence is formed by a main clause (the consequence), a conjunction (if), and a conditional clause (the condition).

What is the first conditional with examples? ›

The first conditional is used to express the future consequence of a realistic possibility now or in the future. For example, If I miss the train, I'll take the next one. There is a 50% chance that the first part of this sentence (the action following 'if') will happen.

What tense should I use after if? ›

the if-clause uses the past perfect tense, and the main clause uses the future perfect conditional tense: would have + past participle of the verb.

What are 1st 2nd 3rd conditionals? ›

The zero conditional. For example: "If you heat ice, it melts." The first conditional. For example: "If it rains, you will stay home." The second conditional: "If I were you, I would look for another job. " The third conditional: "If you had studied harder, you would have become an engineer."

How do you conjugate conditional in Spanish? ›

How do you form the conditional in Spanish? - Easy Learning Grammar Spanish. To form the conditional of regular -ar, -er, and -ir verbs, add the following endings to the infinitive of the verb: -ía, -ías, -ía, -íamos, -íais, -ían.

What is first conditional? ›

Using the first conditional

The first conditional is used to talk about things which are possible in the present or the future — things which may happen: Example. Explanation. If it's sunny, we'll go to the park. Maybe it will be sunny — that's possible.

Why do you use past tense for conditionals? ›

Making hypotheses. Some conditional clauses are like hypotheses, so we use past tense forms. We use past tense forms to talk about something that does not happen or is not happening in the present: He could get a new job if he really tried.

What is the difference between conditional and subjunctive Spanish? ›

The key difference between conditional and subjunctive is that conditional sentences are used to express conditions that are real or unreal, while subjunctive is used to express unreal situations.

Is First conditional A tense? ›

We use will + base verb to talk about the possible future result. The important thing about the first conditional is that there is a real possibility that the condition will happen.
...
First Conditional.
resultifcondition
will + base verbPresent Simple
I will tell MaryifI see her.
He will invite Taraifshe is free tomorrow.
3 more rows

How do you form the future perfect tense in Spanish? ›

The Spanish future perfect tense is formed in much the same way as English's: the future indicative form of haber followed by the past participle. So "I will have left" would be "habré salido."

How do you conjugate the past perfect in Spanish? ›

Past perfect Spanish requires you to use the verb haber (to have) and conjugate it in the imperfect tense as an auxiliary verb, and then add the necessary past participle of the action verb. This gives us the following formula: subject + haber in the imperfect + action verb in its participle (-ado/-ido)

How do you use the subjunctive in Spanish? ›

In Spanish the subjunctive is used after certain verbs and conjunctions when two parts of a sentence have different subjects. Tengo miedo de que le ocurra algo. I'm afraid something may (subjunctive) happen to him.

How do you use simple conditional? ›

Conditional Simple
  1. Use of the Conditional Simple. We use it for something that might happen. We use it in the main clause in type II of the Conditional sentences.
  2. Form. would + infinitive.
  3. Example. I would fly to Sydney if I had the money.

How many conditionals are there? ›

How many conditionals are there? There are four main types of conditional sentences, unimaginatively named the Zero Conditional, First Conditional, Second Conditional, and Third Conditional.

How do you use if in a sentence? ›

You use if in conditional sentences to introduce the circumstances in which an event or situation might happen, might be happening, or might have happened. She gets very upset if I exclude her. You'll feel a lot better about yourself if you work on solutions to your upsetting situations. You can go if you want.

What verbs are irregular in the conditional? ›

The irregular verbs are the same in the conditional tense as they are in the future tense: aller → ir → j'irais - I would go. avoir → aur → j'aurais - I would have. être → ser → je serais - I would be.

What is the difference between por and para? ›

Por is for duration, para is for deadlines

For example: Estudié por (durante) dos horas. I studied for (during) 2 hours. We always use para to refer to a date in the future –typically, when there is a deadline looming.

Is poner a stem change? ›

Change the verb stem.

Poner is irregular in the future tense, even though it still has all the same endings as regular -er verbs. The irregularity lies in the fact that you have to change the verb stem from "pon-" to "pondr-."

What are the 6 conjugations of poner? ›

poner
  • pongo.
  • pones.
  • él/ella/Ud. pone.
  • ponemos.
  • ponéis.
  • ellos/ellas/Uds. ponen.

What tense is Pongo? ›

Present Tense

What are the two parts of a conditional sentence? ›

In a conditional sentence, there are two parts, (1) the antecedent = the protasis, and (2) the consequent = the apodosis. In general I will refer to them simply as "P" and "Q", from the logician's tradition of representing material implication as "P implies Q".

What is conditional sentence order? ›

A conditional sentence is an imprisonment (jail) sentence, except that the offender serves the sentence outside of jail, under strict, jail‑like conditions. Conditional sentences are sometimes called “house arrest,” because they often require an offender to spend all or part of the sentence in their house.

What is the conditional perfect tense in Spanish? ›

The Spanish conditional perfect tense is used to describe something that could have happened in the past but did not due to another event. In some cases it can also imply the probability that this event will happen eventually.

What verbs are irregular in the conditional Spanish? ›

Here are the most common verbs that are irregular in the conditional:
  • Caber (to fit): cabría, cabrías.
  • Decir (to say): diría, dirías.
  • Haber (to have): habría, habrías.
  • Hacer (to do or make): haría, harías.
  • Poder (to be able): podría, podrías.
  • Poner (to put): pondría, pondrías.
  • Querer (to want): querría, querrías.
7 Feb 2019

What triggers imperfect subjunctive? ›

The Imperfect Subjunctive is triggered with a preterite, imperfect, conditional, or past perfect WEIRDO verbs in the independent clause.

What is the difference between por and para? ›

Por is for duration, para is for deadlines

For example: Estudié por (durante) dos horas. I studied for (during) 2 hours. We always use para to refer to a date in the future –typically, when there is a deadline looming.

What is the difference between conditional and conditional perfect? ›

The difference is the normal conditional is used to express something while the action still impact in the present time while the conditional perfect is used to refer to something far in the past and the action has nothing to do in the present because it has finished.

How do you form the future perfect tense in Spanish? ›

The Spanish future perfect tense is formed in much the same way as English's: the future indicative form of haber followed by the past participle. So "I will have left" would be "habré salido."

How do you conjugate the past perfect in Spanish? ›

Past perfect Spanish requires you to use the verb haber (to have) and conjugate it in the imperfect tense as an auxiliary verb, and then add the necessary past participle of the action verb. This gives us the following formula: subject + haber in the imperfect + action verb in its participle (-ado/-ido)

Can you use the conditional in the past in Spanish? ›

Spanish conditionals are used to talk about things that are hypothetical, things that could be or could have been. Like in English, Spanish conditionals can indicate varying degrees of possibility in the present, future and past.

What is the conditional tense of decir? ›

Mode: Conditional
Personal PronounConjugation
Yodiría
Tudirías
El/Elladiría
Nosotrosdiríamos
2 more rows

What is the conditional form of a verb? ›

Conditional verbs are used to create conditional sentences, which express hypothetical or unlikely situations. Conditional verbs can be used in the past, present, or future tense, and auxiliary verbs like can/could, will/would, and may/might are important in forming conditionals.

How do you know when to use present or imperfect subjunctive? ›

Present subjunctive is translated to English in normal present tense, imperfect subjunctive is translated to English in past tense. With present subjunctive we talk about things that might still happen, but imperfect subjunctive expresses things that are not possible anymore.

What is the difference between imperfect indicative and imperfect subjunctive? ›

We simply use the past tense when we want to make a situation hypothetical. The point is, “si” in Spanish will take the imperfect subjunctive when we wish to express a supposition and, like in English, the present indicative when we wish to state a fact.

What is the subjunctive of poner? ›

Poner in the Subjunctive Present
PronounSpanishEnglish
pongasyou put
Ella / Él / Ustedpongas/he put, you (formal) put
Nosotras / Nosotrospongamoswe put
Vosotras / Vosotrospongáisyou (plural) put
2 more rows

Is soy or estoy permanent? ›

“Soy” and “estoy” are both first-person present tense conjugations of verbs meaning 'to be. ' That is to say, they both mean 'I am. ' “Soy” is used when you're talking about permanent, unchanging or rarely changing things. “Estoy” is used when you're talking about things that do vary regularly.

What is the difference between Yo soy and yo estoy? ›

Being a student is something that will stay true throughout the day, so we use soy. On the other hand, we use estoy when we are talking about states or variable things, like the weather or somebody's mood or location.

What porque means? ›

🎶 Porque means “because” in Spanish (and Portuguese).

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