https://www.fluentin3months.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/italian-words_FB.jpg (2022)

https://www.fluentin3months.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/italian-words_FB.jpg (1)

written by
Alice Cimino

Full disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?

What if you could understand Italian conversations by only learning 500 of the most used Italian words?

The Italian language is made up of hundreds of thousands of words — while it is hard to pin down a specific number, some linguists have estimated it to be between 160,000 and 260,000!

For us Italian learners, a number like this one is daunting. How is someone supposed to learn 260,000 words in a foreign language?

But don’t worry! Italians themselves generally use only around 7,000 of these words throughout their lifetimes, and usually only about 1,000 in their daily routine. So who said that with 500 words and some enthusiasm, you couldn’t understand what’s going on in conversations? Even better, you’d be able to participate in them!

In this post, I’m going to introduce you to 500 of the most important Italian words to know if you want to make your Italian learning more effective.

These 500 words are based on frequency of use. That means they’re the most frequently used words in Italian, and the words you’re most likely to come across if you’re listening to or reading Italian or having a conversation in Italian.

It goes without saying that the most important Italian words you should learn depend on your interests and the reasons that push you to learn Italian, for which creating your own script is a good idea.

But it’s also vital to have a strong base of Italian words that you know.

Use this post as a guideline and feel free to include as many listed Italian words as you want in your personalized list!

The 100 Most Used Italian Nouns (+ 20 More Nouns You Need to Know)

Along with verbs (which I’ll come to in a moment), nouns are the most important words to learn in a foreign language. Saying “eat” or “apple” if you are hungry will make your point come across much better than saying “this” or “red”. You might not make Italian teachers proud, but at least you’ll get to fill your stomach.

The most used Italian word is arguably cosa, which translates in many ways in English — including “what”, “thing”, and “matter” — depending on its inflection, grammatical function, or the overall context of the sentence.

Examples:

  • Dammi la cosa rossa. – “Give me the red thing.” In this sentence, cosa is a feminine, singular noun translated as “thing”.
  • Cosa vuoi? – “What do you want?” Here, cosa is the pronoun “what”.
  • Me ne ha parlato coso. – “What’s-his-name told me about it.” Even if it is highly informal and somewhat disdainful, you can use coso to replace a man’s name when you don’t remember it.
  • Spiegami come funziona questo coso. – “Teach me how this thing works.” Coso as a masculine, singular noun also means “thing”, however, it is much more informal than cosa. Being able to differentiate between when to use coso or cosa is mainly a matter of practice. In the meantime, try to avoid coso as much as possible.
  • Hai troppe cose. – “You have too many things.” Cose can mean both “things” and “matters”, and in this sentence, it’s the former.
  • In Eros Ramazzotti’s song Cose Della Vita, cose means “matters”, so the full title translates as “Matters of Life”.

Knowing these are only a few ways to use cosa/o/e in a conversation, you can understand why it comes first in the list of most frequently used Italian nouns. By learning it, you would be able to vaguely say at least half of what you want. But let’s put jokes aside: even if it is tempting to handle a whole language with only a word, it’s not very realistic.

Here are the 99 nouns that pop up the most frequently in Italian conversations besides cosa. I also included some words that do not figure among the most frequently used Italian words in lists, but which are important to learn nonetheless.

  • casa – “house” or ”home”
  • paese – “country” or “town”
  • mondo – “world”
  • città – “city”
  • strada – “road”
  • piazza – “square”
  • sala – “room”
  • ufficio – “office”
  • zona – “zone”
  • isola – “island”

Additional word: posto – “place”

  • anno – “year”
  • giorno – “day”
  • volta – “time” in the sense of “occasion”
  • tempo – “time”
  • ora – “hour”
  • momento – “moment”
  • notte – “night”
  • sera – “evening”
  • mese – “month”
  • periodo – “period” or “interval”

Additional words:

  • ieri – “yesterday”
  • oggi – “today”
  • domani – “tomorrow”
  • minuto – “minute”
  • uomo – “man”
  • donna – “woman”
  • signore/a – “sir”/“madam” or “man”/“woman”. Signore with a capital ‘s’ is used as another way to say “Dio” (“God”).
  • padre – “father”
  • figlio/a – “son”/“daughter”
  • persona – “person”
  • gente – “people”
  • amico/a – “friend”
  • famiglia – “family”
  • nemico/a – “enemy”
  • sorella – “sister”

Additional word: madre – “mother”

  • acqua – “water”
  • aria – “air”
  • mare – “sea”
  • luce – “light”
  • sole – “sun”
  • albero – “tree”
  • fiore – “flower”
  • natura – “nature”
  • fuoco – “fire”
  • campagna – “(the) country”

Additional words:

  • terra – “land” or “ground”, “Earth” when it is written with a capital “T”.
  • vento – “wind”
  • vita – “life”
  • mano – “hand”
  • occhio – “eye”
  • parte – “part”
  • voce – “voice”
  • piede – “foot”
  • testa – “head”
  • mente – “mind”

Additional words:

  • bocca – “mouth”
  • gamba – “leg”
  • braccio – “arm”

50 Other Frequently Used Italian Nouns (+ Ten Additional Italian Nouns)

  • modo – “manner” or “way”
  • parola – “word”
  • punto – “dot”, “period”, or “moment”
  • lavoro – “job” or “work”
  • stato – “state”
  • caso – “case” or “coincidence”
  • guerra – “war”
  • nome – “name”
  • fatto – “fact”
  • amore – “love”
  • storia – “story” or “history”, occasionally “lies”, “fuss”, and “business” in informal conversations
  • forza – “strength”
  • ragione – “reason”
  • via – “street” or “road”
  • capo – “boss” or “head”
  • specie – “species” or “kind”
  • governo – “government”
  • senso – “sense”
  • opera – “work” or “opera”
  • prodotto – “product”
  • festa – “party”
  • gioco – “game”
  • prova – “test” or “trial”
  • misura – “measure”
  • posizione – “position”
  • successo – “success”
  • vista – “sight”
  • libertà – “freedom”
  • risultato – “result”
  • importanza – “importance”
  • dubbio – “doubt”
  • ricerca – “research”
  • figura – “figure” or “image”
  • questione – “matter” or “issue”
  • pena – “pain”, “sentence”, or “pity”
  • motivo – “motive”
  • esperienza – “experience”
  • ricordo – “memory” or “souvenir”
  • politica – “politics”
  • processo – “process”
  • vino – “wine”
  • porta – “door”
  • sud – “south”
  • sogno – “dream”
  • cane – “dog”
  • movimento – “movement”
  • occasione – “occasion”
  • prezzo – “price”
  • causa – “cause”
  • sviluppo – “development”

Additional words:

  • fame – “hunger”
  • sete – “thirst”
  • niente – “nothing”
  • qualcosa – “something”
  • aiuto – “help”
  • errore – “mistake”
  • domanda – “question”
  • risposta – “answer”
  • macchina – “car”
  • aereo – “plane”

The 100 Most Used Italian Verbs

Verbs are all about action — doing things. That could be running, cooking, sleeping, whatever. If you (or someone else, or something else) is doing something, there’s a verb involved. You’ll find a verb in every Italian sentence, so it’s important that you know them.

Learning 100 of the most used Italian verbs will allow you to understand way more conversations that you might think.

The 2 Italian Auxiliaries

Before we dive into the full list of most common Italian verbs, let’s take a good look at the Italian auxiliaries, essere (“to be”) and avere (“to have”). I’ll come to why these matter in just a moment.

Essere

  • (io) sono – “I am”
  • (tu) sei – “you are”
  • (egli/essa/esso) è – “he/she/it is”
  • (noi) siamo – “we are”
  • (voi) siete – “you (all) are”
  • (essi/esse) sono – “they are”

Avere

  • (io) ho – “I have”
  • (tu) hai – “you have”
  • (egli/essa/esso) ha – “he/she/it has”
  • (noi) abbiamo – “we have”
  • (voi) avete – “you (all)” have”
  • (essi/esse) hanno – “they have”

Not only are the verbi ausiliari (“auxiliaries”) useful for making up composed tenses, but many verbal phrases that in English start with “to be” use avere as their core.

Examples:

  • avere sonno – “to be sleepy”
  • avere fame – “to be hungry”
  • avere ragione – “to be right”

By using avere + noun, you can even sometimes replace other verbs: avere voglia can replace volere (“to want”).

Top 10 Most Frequently Used Italian Verbs

Besides the auxiliaries, there are 10 other most frequently used Italian verbs:

  • fare – “to do”
  • dire – “to say”
  • potere – “to can” or “to be able to”
  • volere – “to want”
  • sapere – “to know”
  • stare – “to stay”
  • dovere – “to must” or “to have to”
  • vedere – “to see”
  • andare – “to go”
  • venire – “to come”

I’ve divided the next 88 most used Italian verbs into three lists, depending on the group of verbs they belong to.

The 34 Most Used Italian Verbs in the First Group: -are

  • dare – “to give”
  • parlare – “to speak”
  • trovare – “to find”
  • lasciare – “to let go” or “to leave”
  • guardare – “to watch”
  • pensare – “to think”
  • passare – “to pass”, “to move”, or “to hand”
  • portare – “to bring”
  • tornare – “to come back”
  • sembrare – “to seem” or “to look like”
  • chiamare – “to call”
  • cercare – “to look for” or “to search for”
  • entrare – “to enter”
  • ricordare – “to remember”
  • aspettare – “to wait”
  • arrivare – “to arrive”
  • diventare – “to become”
  • mangiare – “to eat”
  • camminare – “to walk”
  • toccare – “to touch”
  • considerare – “to consider”
  • mandare – “to send”
  • domandare – “to ask”
  • ascoltare – “to listen”
  • osservare – “to observe”
  • spiegare – “to explain”
  • mostrare – “to show”
  • significare – “to mean”
  • desiderare – “to wish”
  • giudicare – “to judge”
  • avvicinare – “to move closer” or “to approach”
  • ordinare – “to organize”, “to tidy up”, or “to order”
  • invitare – “to invite”
  • sbagliare – “to make a mistake”, “to miss”, or “to be mistaken”

The 33 Most Used Italian Verbs in the Second Group: -ere, -arre, -orre, or -urre

  • prendere – “to take”
  • mettere – “to put”
  • credere – “to believe”
  • vivere – “to live”
  • parere – “to seem”, “to appear”, “to believe” or “to think”
  • tenere – “to keep” or “to grip”
  • rispondere – “to answer”
  • chiudere – “to close” or “to end”
  • bere – “to drink”
  • raggiungere – “to reach”
  • comprendere – “to understand” or “to comprehend”
  • scendere – “to get off” or “to go down”
  • compiere – “to accomplish”, “to complete”, or “to carry out”
  • muovere – “to move”
  • conoscere – “to know”
  • chiedere – “to ask”
  • stringere – “to tighten”
  • decidere – “to decide”
  • ricevere – “to receive”
  • permettere – “to allow”
  • raccogliere – “to pick up”
  • ottenere – “to obtain”
  • ammettere – “to admit”
  • vendere – “to sell”
  • distinguere – “to distinguish” or “to recognize”
  • offendere – “to offend”
  • rimettere – “to replace” or “to refer”. When it is written as a
  • rompere – “to break”
  • godere – “to enjoy”
  • imporre – “to impose”
  • produrre – “to produce”
  • discutere – “to discuss” or “to argue” spegnere
  • prevedere – “to foresee”
  • spegnere – “to turn off” or “to put out”

The 21 Most Used Italian Verbs in the Third Group -ire

  • sentire – “to feel” or “to hear”
  • capire – “to understand”
  • morire – “to die”
  • aprire – “to open”
  • uscire – “to go out”
  • riuscire – “to succeed”
  • finire – “to end” or “to finish”
  • scrivere – “to write”
  • dormire – “to sleep”
  • avvenire – “to happen” or “to take place”
  • offrire – “to offer”
  • fuggire – “to flee”
  • riferire – “to refer”
  • impedire – “to prevent” or “to forbid”
  • divertire – “to entertain” or “to amuse”
  • fornire – “to provide”
  • riempire – “to fill”
  • scoprire – “to discover”
  • partire – “to leave” or “to depart”
  • unire – “to unite”
  • colpire – “to hit”

198 Frequently Used Italian Adjectives and Adverbs

Sometimes nouns and verbs on their own can’t convey a message clearly enough, and that’s when adjectives and adverbs come in handy.

These 198 frequently used Italian adjectives and adverbs will make your Italian much more colourful and bring your Italian to life.

The 8 Italian Possessive Adjectives

  • mio (mia/miei/mie) – “mine”
  • tuo (tua/tuoi/tue) – “yours” (singular second person)
  • suo (sua/suoi/sue) – “his” or “hers”
  • nostro (nostra/nostri/nostre) – “ours”
  • vostro (vostra/vostri/vostre) – “yours” (plural second person)
  • loro – “theirs”

Unlike in English, possessive adjectives in Italian have to agree with the noun that is possessed, and not the possessor, in genre and number.

Examples:

  • Il mio albero – “my tree”
  • La tua famiglia – “your family”
  • I suoi amici – “his friends”
  • Le nostre mani – “our hands”

Note: Loro is an exception as it always remains the same, no matter the noun to which it refers.

Examples:

  • i loro piedi – “their feet”
  • la loro vita – “their life”
  • le loro parole – “their words”

There are two additional Italian possessive adjectives which don’t have evident equivalents in English:

  • proprio (a/i/e) – “his own”/“her own”/“their own”

When proprio is a possessive adjective, it is used instead of suo/a and loro and only when it refers to something that belongs to the subject of the sentence: Ognuno porta il proprio cuaderno (“Everyone brings their own notebook.”)

  • altrui – “of others”/“of someone else”

Altrui is used when the noun to which it refers belongs to an indefinite person: le cose altrui (“other people’s things”).

Unlike proprio, altrui does not change depending on the genre and number of the noun it refers to.

8 Italian Indefinite Adjectives

Words we use on a daily basis like tutto/a/i/e (“all”), troppo/a/i/e (“too much/many”), and altro/a/i/e (“other”) are indefinite adjectives. They describe nouns in a non-specific sense: Devo parlare ad altre persone (“I need to talk to other people”).

  • tutto/a – “all”
  • poco/a – “little”
  • alcuno/a – “not any”, “no”, or “some”
  • ogni – “each”
  • qualsiasi – “any”
  • qualche – “some” or “a few”
  • altro/a – “other” or “different”

62 Italian Adjectives of Number

In Italian, the principal types of adjectives of number include the numeri cardinali (“cardinal numbers”), numeri ordinali (“ordinal numbers”), numeri moltiplicativi (“multiplicative numbers”) and numeri frazionari (“fractional numbers”).

The terms might sound intimidating, but they are actually very simple.

31 Italian Cardinal Numbers:

  • uno/a – “one”
  • due – “two”
  • tre – “three”
  • quattro – “four”
  • cinque – “five”
  • sei – “six”
  • sette – “seven”
  • otto – “eight”
  • nove – “nine”
  • dieci – “ten”
  • undici – “eleven”
  • dodici – “twelve”
  • tredici – “thirteen”
  • quattordici – “fourteen”
  • quindici – “fifteen”
  • sedici – “sixteen”
  • diciassette – “seventeen”
  • diciotto – “eighteen”
  • diciannove – “nineteen”
  • venti – “twenti”
  • trenta – “thirty”
  • quaranta – “fourty”
  • cinquanta – “fifty”
  • sessanta – “sixty”
  • settanta – “seventy”
  • ottanta – “eighty”
  • novanta – “ninety”
  • cento – “hundred” or “a hundred”
  • mille – “thousand” or “a thousand”
  • millione – “million”
  • milliardo – “billion”

You can form other cardinal numbers by combining some of these 31 words, such as trentuno (“thirty-one”) or duecentocinquantotto (“two hundred fifty-eight”).

The 13 Main Italian Ordinal Numbers:

  • primo/a – “first”
  • secondo/a – “second”
  • terzo/a – “third”
  • quarto/a – “fourth”
  • quinto/a – “fifth”
  • sesto/a – “sixth”
  • ottavo – “eighth”
  • nono – “ninth”
  • decimo – “tenth”
  • centesimo – “hundredth”
  • millesimo – “thousandth”

Note: ultimo is “last”.

The 6 Main Italian Multiplicative Numbers:

  • doppio/a – “double”
  • triplo/a/triplice – “triple”
  • quadruplo/a/quadruplice – “quadruple”
  • quintuplo/a/quintuplice – “quintuple”
  • decuplo/a/decuplice – “tenfold”
  • centuplo/a/centuplice – “a hundred times as much”

The 12 Main Italian Fractional Numbers:

  • mezzo/a/metà – “half”
  • un terzo – “one third”
  • un quarto – “one fourth”
  • un quinto – “one fifth”
  • un sesto – “one sixth”
  • un settimo – “one seventh”
  • un ottavo – “one eighth”
  • un nono – “one ninth”
  • un decimo – “one tenth”
  • un centesimo – “one hundredth”
  • un millesimo – “one thousandth”

50 of the Most Frequently Used Italian Adjectives

Some adjectives make it possible to describe the way something appears, where it is from, or the feelings it inspires. Here are 50 of the most frequently used Italian adjectives to help you do just so.

  • grande – “big”
  • stesso/a – “same”
  • bello/a – “beautiful” or “gorgeous”
  • nuovo/a – “new”
  • certo/a – “sure” or “certain”
  • vero/a – “true”
  • buono/a – “good”
  • italiano/a – “Italian”
  • vecchio/a – “old”
  • piccolo/a – “small”
  • giovane – “young”
  • alto/a – “tall”
  • diverso/a – “different”
  • lungo/a – “long”
  • povero/a – “poor”
  • maggiore– “greater”, “elder”, or “older
  • possibile – “possible”
  • caro/a – “expensive” or “dear”
  • pieno/a – “full”
  • nero/a – “black”
  • particolare – “specific” or “unique”
  • bianco/a – “white”
  • attuale – “current”
  • latino/a – “Latin”
  • impossibile – “impossible”
  • sereno/a – “serene” or “sunny”
  • puro/a – “pure”
  • normale – “normal”
  • perfetto/a – “perfect”
  • caratteristico/a – “characteristic”
  • russo/a – “Russian”
  • continuo/a – “continuous”
  • stupido/a – “stupid”
  • estremo/a – “extreme”
  • grigio/a – “gray”
  • reale – “real”
  • interessante – “interesting”
  • medesimo/a – “same”
  • religioso/a – “religious”
  • ampio/a – “wide”
  • biondo/a – “blonde”
  • ufficiale – “official”
  • attento – “attentive” or “alert”
  • enorme – “enormous”
  • sottile – “thin”
  • triste – “sad”
  • minimo – “smallest”, “slightest”, or “minimal”
  • privato/a – “private”
  • rapido/a – “fast”
  • diretto/a – “direct”

23 Italian Adverbs Derived from Adjectives

While adjectives mainly describe nouns, adverbs tend to modify, well… verbs. If you need an adverb but know only the adjective that explains the concept, chances are you will be able to build the adverb following the following rules.

In English, we sometimes add the suffix -ly to an adjective to turn it into an adverb. In Italian, the process is similar.

With adjectives that end in -o: Add -mente to the feminine form of the adjective.

Examples:

  • veramente – “truly”, “really”, or “actually”
  • francamente – “frankly”
  • esattamente – “exactly”
  • sinceramente – “sincerely”
  • profondamente – “deeply” or “profoundly”
  • certamente – “certainly”
  • improvvisamente – “suddenly”
  • chiaramente – “clearly”
  • direttamente – “directly”
  • raramente – “rarely”
  • altamente – “highly”

With adjectives that end in -e: Sometimes, you have to remove the -e and add -mente

Examples:

  • specialmente – “especially”
  • particolarmente – “particularly”
  • talmente – “so much” or “to such an extent”
  • cordialmente – “cordially”
  • abitualmente – “usually”
  • finalmente – “finally”
  • probabilmente – “probably”
  • eventualmente – “possibly”

Other times, you simply add -mente at the end of the word.

Examples:

  • velocemente – “quickly”
  • semplicemente – “simply”
  • recentemente – “recently”
  • fortemente – “strongly”

Practice is your best ally to differentiate when to do what with adjectives ending in -e.

Now let’s explore the realm of Italian adverbs that do not derive from adjectives.

12 Italian Adverbs of Place

  • fuori – “outside”
  • dentro – “inside”
  • sotto – “under” or “below”
  • davanti – “in front”
  • dietro – “behind” or “back”
  • qui – “here”, precise location
  • qua – “here”, imprecise location
  • – “there”, precise location
  • – “there”, imprecise location
  • via – “away”
  • lontano – “far”
  • vicino – “close”

11 Italian Adverbs of Quantity

  • più – “more”
  • meno – “less”
  • solo – “only”
  • tanto – “more” or “very much”
  • quasi – “almost”
  • poco – “little”
  • parecchio – “quite a lot” or “much”
  • abbastanza – “quite” or “enough”
  • almeno – “at least”
  • circa – “about” or “around”
  • per nulla – “at all”

11 Italian Adverbs of Time

  • poi – “then”
  • adesso – “now”
  • sempre – “always” or “forever”
  • mai – “never” or “never”
  • prima – “before”
  • subito – “immediately”
  • dopo – “after”
  • durante – “during”
  • ancora – “again” or “still”
  • presto – “soon”, “early”, or “rapidly”
  • già – “before” or “already”

8 Italian Adverbs of Manner

  • bene/ben – “well”
  • male – “bad”
  • forte – “heavily”
  • piano – “slowly” or “quietly”
  • appena – “just” or “only”
  • insieme – “together”
  • volentieri – “gladly” or “willingly”
  • meglio – “better”
  • peggio – “worse”

5 Miscellaneous Italian Adverbs

  • pure – “even”, “also”, or “too”
  • forse – “maybe”
  • piuttosto – “instead” or “rather”
  • inoltre – “moreover”
  • oltretutto – “besides”

The 10 Italian Subject Pronouns

Although these pronouns aren’t usually used in spoken Italian, it’s important to learn the 10 Italian subject pronouns to be able to study Italian conjugation.

  • io – “I”
  • tu – “you” (singular second person)
  • egli, ella, esso, Lei – “he”, “she”, “it”, “you” (formal singular)
  • noi – “us”
  • voi – “you” (plural)
  • essi, esse – “they” masculine, “they” feminine

Note: Egli, ella, esso, essi, esse are even less used than io, tu, Lei, noi, and voi in verbal communcation as they sound very formal. Often, they are replaced by lui (for egli), lei (for essa), and loro (for essi, esse), but only colloquially. Using lui, lei, and loro as subject pronouns is grammatically incorrect, but is done more and more often.

The 10 Italian Reflexive Pronouns

Reflexive pronouns are useful in sentences such as mi lavo (“I wash myself”). They indicate that the person who’s doing the action is also the recipient of the action.

In Italian, the reflexive pronouns are:

  • mi – “myself”
  • ti – “yourself”
  • si – “himself”/“herself”/“itself”/“yourself” (formal)
  • ci – “ourselves”
  • vi – “yourselves”
  • si – “themselves”

20 Core Italian Conjunctions and Connectors

Conjunctions and connectors are, you guessed it, words that help us tie together two parts of a sentence.

In Italian, the most used conjunctions and connectors are:

  • e – “and”
  • anche – “as well”, “also”, or “even”
  • dunque – “so”
  • allora – “so” or “therefore”
  • però – “but”, “yet”, or “however”
  • ma – “but”
  • perché – “because”
  • mentre – “while” or “whereas”
  • contro – “against”
  • invece – “instead”
  • o – “or”
  • – “neither” or “nor”
  • cioè – “that is (to say)” or “namely”
  • anzi – “instead”, “actually”, or “rather”
  • quindi – “therefore”
  • così – “thus”
  • perciò – “so” or “for this reason”
  • finché – “as long as”
  • nonostante – “although” or “even though”
  • a meno che or a meno che non – “unless”

The 10 Core Italian Prepositions

Prepositions show the relationship between two elements of a sentence. In Italian, the most common ones are:

  • tra – “between”
  • fra – “among”
    di – “of” or “from”
    a – “at”, “in”, or “on”
    da/dal/dalla – “from” or “to”
  • in – “at”, “in”, “to”, or “into”
    su – “on”, “up”, or “over”
    per – “for”
  • con – “with”
  • senza – “without”

The 7 Italian Question Words

Learning a new language conveys a lot of question-asking, which you will be able to face much better by knowing the seven question words in Italian:

  • chi – “who”
  • che – “what” (note: cosa? is also used to ask, “what?”)
  • dove – “where”
  • quando – “when”
  • come – “how”
  • perché – “why” (note: when not used as a question word but as a conjunction, perché means “because”)
  • quale (quali) – “which”

7 Popular Italian Interjections

Italians are fans of interjections, those little words that reveal the emotions of the speaker in a spontaneous reaction.

Here are some of the most popular Italian interjections:

  • – “yes”
  • no – “no” (mind-blowing, I know)
  • toh – “here, have it” or “look” → Example: Toh, chi si vede! (“Look who’s here!”)
  • peccato – “what a shame” (literally “sin”)
  • dai – “come on” (literally “give”)
  • ciao – “hello” and “goodbye”
  • ecco – “here”, “there”, or used to express comprehension → Ecco, lo sapevo! (“There, I knew it!”)

The 7 Italian Definite Articles

Unlike in English, gli articoli determinativi (“definite articles”) agree with the noun they refer to. Therefore, instead of being just one definite article like in English (“the”), there are six of them:

  • il or lo – “the” (masculine singular versions)
  • i or gli – “the” (masculine plural versions)
  • la – “the” (feminine singular version)
  • le – “the” (feminine plural version)
  • l’ – singular “the” placed in front of both masculine and feminine nouns that start with a vowel. It essentially is a contraction of lo and la.

Why are there two versions for the masculine “the”, both plural and singular? The default masculine definite articles are il and i, but they don’t sound good in front of certain combinations of letters. Therefore, lo and gli sometimes replace them.

You can learn the difference through practice, but I’m still leaving the rules here in case you’d like to give them a try (they’re quite easy!)

Lo and gli are used before words that start with:

  • pn-
  • *ps- *
  • gn-
  • z-
  • x-
  • y-
  • s- followed by a consonant
  • i- followed by a voyel

*Gli* precedes words that start with a vowel.

The 4 Italian Indefinite Articles

Unlike their definite cousins, gli articoli indeterminativi (“indefinite articles”) in Italian only exist in singular form. They are the equivalent of the English “a” and “an”.

  • un – “a” or “an” (standard masculine version)
  • uno – “a” (masculine version used in front of words starting z or s followed by a consonant)
  • una – “a” (feminine version in front of consonants)
  • un’ – “an” (feminine version in front of vowels)

The 7 Italian Partitive Articles

Gli articoli partitivi (“partitive articles”) are essential in Italian because they introduce unknown amounts. You could consider them the translation of “some” in sentences such as voglio dell’acqua (“I want some water”) or dammi dei prodotti (“give me some products”).

  • del – “some” (standard masculine singular version)
  • dello – “some” (masculine singular version)
  • della – “some” (feminine singular version in front of consonants)
  • dell’ – “some” (feminine and masculine singular version in front of vowels)
  • dei’ – “some” (masculine plural version)
  • degli’ – “some” (masculine plural version)
  • delle – “some” (feminine plural version)

The same rules that apply to the use of il, lo, i, gli apply to del, dello, dei, degli.

Strengthen Your Italian with the Most Used Italian Words

How do you feel about discovering the 500 core Italian words?

What if, by learning only five words every day, you’d ended up being able to have Italian interactions in around three months? Maybe you could participate in the Fluent in 3 Months Challenge to keep you motivated. By the end of the 90 days, you’d get to have a 15-minute conversation in Italian and use those 500 words!

You can also enrich your vocabulary by checking out these resources for learning Italian.

https://www.fluentin3months.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/italian-words_FB.jpg (2)

Alice Cimino

Student, Freelance Content Creator

Alice is an undergraduate student who loves fiction, languages, and challenges. She's a bilingual by birth and a quadrilingual by consequence.

Speaks: French, Italian, Spanish, English

View all posts by Alice Cimino

written by Alice CiminoFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?What if you could understand Italian conversations by only learning 500 of the most used Italian words?The Italian language is made up of hundreds of thousands of words — while it is hard to pin down a specific number, some...

What if you could understand Italian conversations by only learning 500 of the most used Italian words?. The Italian language is made up of hundreds of thousands of words — while it is hard to pin down a specific number, some linguists have estimated it to be between 160,000 and 260,000!. In this post, I’m going to introduce you to 500 of the most important Italian words to know if you want to make your Italian learning more effective.. That means they’re the most frequently used words in Italian, and the words you’re most likely to come across if you’re listening to or reading Italian or having a conversation in Italian.. – “Give me the red thing.” In this sentence, cosa is a feminine, singular noun translated as “thing”.. Being able to differentiate between when to use coso or cosa is mainly a matter of practice.. You’ll find a verb in every Italian sentence, so it’s important that you know them.. Learning 100 of the most used Italian verbs will allow you to understand way more conversations that you might think.. There are two additional Italian possessive adjectives which don’t have evident equivalents in English:. Altrui is used when the noun to which it refers belongs to an indefinite person: le cose altrui (“other people’s things”).. Unlike proprio , altrui does not change depending on the genre and number of the noun it refers to.. With adjectives that end in -o : Add -mente to the feminine form of the adjective.. What if, by learning only five words every day, you’d ended up being able to have Italian interactions in around three months?

written by Caitlin SacasasFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Preparing for a trip to South Korea? The best way to get ready is to learn a few common Korean phrases before you go!Why should you learn some basic Korean greetings and words? Because it will help you get the most from...

Essential Korean greetings and phrases Common Korean phrases for getting around Informal Korean phrases and slang. Now, let’s learn Korean.. “Hi” – 안녕하세요 ( annyeong haseyo ) “Nice to Meet You” – 반갑습니다 ( bangapseubnida ) “My Name is…” – 제 이름은… ( je ileum-eun ) “Yes” – 예 ( ye ) “No” – 아니 ( ani ).. “Bye” – 안녕 ( annyeong ) “Good Morning” – 좋은아침이에요 ( joeun achimieyo ) “Goodnight” – 안녕히 주무세요 ( annyeonghi jumuseyo ) “Please” – 주세요 ( juseyo ) “Thank You” – 감사합니다 ( gamsahabnida ) “Excuse Me” – 실례합니다 ( sillyehabnida ) “I’m Sorry” – 미안해요 ( mianhaeyo ) / 죄송해요 ( joesonghaeyo ) “Okay” – 괜찮아요 ( gwaenchanayo ) “Left” – 왼쪽 ( oenjjok ) “Right” – 오른쪽 ( oleunjjok ) Straight – 직진 ( jigjin ) “Please go to…” – …(으)로가주세요 ( (eu)lo gajuseyo ) “Where is…” – …이어디예요 ( i eodiyeyo ) “I don’t know” – 몰라요 ( mollayo ) “I want to speak in Korean” – 한국어를하고 싶습니다 ( Hangukeo-leul hago sipseubnida ) “Please speak slowly” – 천천히 말씀해 주세요 ( cheoncheonhi malsseumhae juseyo ) “The menu, please” – 메뉴주세요 ( menyu juseyo ) “Bill, please” – 계산서주세요 ( gyesanseo juseyo ) “I have an allergy to…” – …알레르기가 있습니다.. The best way to get ready is to learn a few common Korean phrases before you go!Why should you learn some basic Korean greetings and words?. Essential Korean greetings and phrases Common Korean phrases for getting around Informal Korean phrases and slang.. I’ll first list the phrases as a “quick guide”, then I’ll go in-depth on when to use the phrases.. “Bye” – 안녕 ( annyeong ) “Good Morning” – 좋은아침이에요 ( joeun achimieyo ) “Goodnight” – 안녕히 주무세요 ( annyeonghi jumuseyo ) “Please” – 주세요 ( juseyo ) “Thank You” – 감사합니다 ( gamsahabnida ) “Excuse Me” – 실례합니다 ( sillyehabnida ) “I’m Sorry” – 미안해요 ( mianhaeyo ) / 죄송해요 ( joesonghaeyo ) “Okay” – 괜찮아요 ( gwaenchanayo ) “Left” – 왼쪽 ( oenjjok ) “Right” – 오른쪽 ( oleunjjok ) Straight – 직진 ( jigjin ) “Please go to…” – …(으)로가주세요 ( (eu)lo gajuseyo ) “Where is…” – …이어디예요 ( i eodiyeyo ) “I don’t know” – 몰라요 ( mollayo ) “I want to speak in Korean” – 한국어를하고 싶습니다 ( Hangukeo-leul hago sipseubnida ) “Please speak slowly” – 천천히 말씀해 주세요 ( cheoncheonhi malsseumhae juseyo ) “The menu, please” – 메뉴주세요 ( menyu juseyo ) “Bill, please” – 계산서주세요 ( gyesanseo juseyo ) “I have an allergy to…” – …알레르기가 있습니다... The best way to get ready is to learn a few common Korean phrases before you go!Why should you learn some basic Korean greetings and words?. Essential Korean greetings and phrases Common Korean phrases for getting around Informal Korean phrases and slang.. I’ll first list the phrases as a “quick guide”, then I’ll go in-depth on when to use the phrases.. “Bye” – 안녕 ( annyeong ) “Good Morning” – 좋은아침이에요 ( joeun achimieyo ) “Goodnight” – 안녕히 주무세요 ( annyeonghi jumuseyo ) “Please” – 주세요 ( juseyo ) “Thank You” – 감사합니다 ( gamsahabnida ) “Excuse Me” – 실례합니다 ( sillyehabnida ) “I’m Sorry” – 미안해요 ( mianhaeyo ) / 죄송해요 ( joesonghaeyo ) “Okay” – 괜찮아요 ( gwaenchanayo ) “Left” – 왼쪽 ( oenjjok ) “Right” – 오른쪽 ( oleunjjok ) Straight – 직진 ( jigjin ) “Please go to…” – …(으)로가주세요 ( (eu)lo gajuseyo ) “Where is…” – …이어디예요 ( i eodiyeyo ) “I don’t know” – 몰라요 ( mollayo ) “I want to speak in Korean” – 한국어를하고 싶습니다 ( Hangukeo-leul hago sipseubnida ) “Please speak slowly” – 천천히 말씀해 주세요 ( cheoncheonhi malsseumhae juseyo ) “The menu, please” – 메뉴주세요 ( menyu juseyo ) “Bill, please” – 계산서주세요 ( gyesanseo juseyo ) “I have an allergy to…” – …알레르기가 있습니다... They'll add more natural, casual language to your Japanese conversations.. Once you've watched the video, then you can read the rest of the article to learn all 37 cool Japanese words and phrases.. Because you may not have these words in your own native language, you may never have thought to learn them in Japanese before.. One thing to know about making words “cool” in Japanese: Almost any word can be made cooler or more slangy by combining or shortening it.. You’ll hear this last example a lot in everyday casual speech.. Spanish is a beautiful language... Everyone needs a little help sometimes when learning a new language.. Having a good English to Korean translator app will help you look up words as you want to learn them and add them to your study list.. With that said, let’s look at some of the best Korean translator apps... Spanish was the first language I learned to a conversational level, so I get this question a lot... You'll learn to understand the language and all its inner workings, going deep in your study of Spanish grammar and the subtleties of the language.. Related Learning: How to Find the Right Online Language Tutor for Your Language Classes.. You'll learn to understand the language and all its inner workings, going deep in your study of Spanish grammar and the subtleties of the language.. Related Learning: How to Find the Right Online Language Tutor for Your Language Classes.. They'll add more natural, casual language to your Japanese conversations.. Once you've watched the video, then you can read the rest of the article to learn all 37 cool Japanese words and phrases.. Because you may not have these words in your own native language, you may never have thought to learn them in Japanese before.. One thing to know about making words “cool” in Japanese: Almost any word can be made cooler or more slangy by combining or shortening it.. You’ll hear this last example a lot in everyday casual speech.. Spanish is a beautiful language... Everyone needs a little help sometimes when learning a new language.. Having a good English to Korean translator app will help you look up words as you want to learn them and add them to your study list.. With that said, let’s look at some of the best Korean translator apps... Spanish was the first language I learned to a conversational level, so I get this question a lot... You'll learn to understand the language and all its inner workings, going deep in your study of Spanish grammar and the subtleties of the language.. Related Learning: How to Find the Right Online Language Tutor for Your Language Classes.. “What’s the best way to learn Spanish?”... “Expertise” works well because it shows that you’ve spent a lot of time learning about things... One of the best ways to start studying is to learn the basics of reading and writing in Japanese... The sounds in the Japanese alphabet are one thing that makes Japanese easier for English speakers to learn than for Japanese speakers to learn English.. Japanese contains almost no new sounds for English speakers, whereas English has many sounds not found in Japanese... They'll add more natural, casual language to your Japanese conversations.. Once you've watched the video, then you can read the rest of the article to learn all 37 cool Japanese words and phrases.. Because you may not have these words in your own native language, you may never have thought to learn them in Japanese before.. One thing to know about making words “cool” in Japanese: Almost any word can be made cooler or more slangy by combining or shortening it.. You’ll hear this last example a lot in everyday casual speech.. Spanish is a beautiful language... Everyone needs a little help sometimes when learning a new language.. Having a good English to Korean translator app will help you look up words as you want to learn them and add them to your study list.. With that said, let’s look at some of the best Korean translator apps... Spanish was the first language I learned to a conversational level, so I get this question a lot... You'll learn to understand the language and all its inner workings, going deep in your study of Spanish grammar and the subtleties of the language.. Related Learning: How to Find the Right Online Language Tutor for Your Language Classes.. “What’s the best way to learn Spanish?”....

written by Alice CiminoFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Every language has its own turns of phrase and quirky sayings, and we Italians are fond of our many aforismi e proverbi (“aphorisms and proverbs”).Italian sayings communicate a message with wisdom and humor, two appreciated...

Italian sayings communicate a message with wisdom and humor, two appreciated traits in the Italian culture.. That’s why one thing you should focus on when learning Italian is Italian sayings.. Plus, by learning Italian sayings you’ll get an insight into Italian culture and how Italians think.. In this article, you’ll find popular Italian sayings about life, success, friendship, family, and food, as well as some Latin expressions that are still widely used in the Boot and a list of Italian idioms.. There’s another Italian phrase with a similar meaning.. This one is not very popular as it is more recent than any of the above-mentioned phrases, but I wanted to include it because it’s one of the most beautiful Italian sayings I’ve ever heard.. Non tutte le ciambelle riescono col buco literally means “not all doughnuts come out with a hole.” If this saying makes you feel perplexed, don’t worry, you’re not alone: even some Italians are not too keen on it!. First of all, why would Italians talk about doughnuts as they’re not a typical Italian food?. Here, you can learn four Italian sayings about love.. You’ve learnt many Italian proverbs and sayings as well as some Latin ones… Now how about getting to know some Italian idioms?. Farsi in quattro (literally, “Make oneself in four”) is the Italian way to say that you’ve gone out of your way to do something.

written by Benny LewisFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?How do you say “hello” in German? There are many options, from a simple hallo to a friendly alles klar to a regional “hello” like servus or na.In this article, I'll teach you several common and useful German greetings . By t...

How do you say “hello” in German?. There are many options, from a simple hallo to a friendly alles klar to a regional “hello” like servus or na .. It's a friendly, all-purpose greeting that can be used in pretty much any situation, formal or informal.. Guten means “good” (it's the masculine accusative form of gut ).. A common question: why is it guten Tag and not gut Tag ?. If you live or travel in Germany, you'll hear people saying alles klar all the time.. Greeting someone with “alles klar?” is a lot like greeting someone with “what's up?” in English.. You could also reply with “Ja, alles klar, danke , meaning “Yes, everything is good thanks.. is like saying “what's up?” or “what's going on?”, very similar to greeting someone with alles klar?. “How does it go to you?” is the literal translation of this essential German phrase.. Moin is a common greeting in northern Germany, especially in and around Hamburg.. Na is another regional German greeting.. There's no easy way to translate na into English.. In English I'd say “it's Benny”, but you can't translate this directly into German (i.e.. I can't say es ist Benny ).

written by Benny LewisFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Are you wondering how to express your love in French? It's no secret that French is widely considered to be one of the most romantic languages with many romantic expressions. For example, “my love” in French is mon amour.Eve...

So, what are some other romantic French words and phrases you can learn as you take your first steps into the language of love?. “My love” – mon amour “My dear” – mon chéri/ma chérie “I love you” – Je t'aime “I miss you” – Tu me manques “Beautiful” – beau/belle “Beauty” – la beauté “Pretty” – joli/jolie “Cute” – mignon/mignonne “Friend” – un ami/une amie “Heart” – le cœur “Feelings” – les sentiments “Lover” – amoureux/amoureuse “My sweet” – mon doux / ma douce “Angel” – ange. There aren't many French terms of endearment more romantic than mon amour , which means “my love” in French.. Whether you're speaking to a man or a woman, the term is the same: mon amour .. So if you wanted to say something romantic like “Good morning, my love” in French, you’d say “ Bonjour mon amour .. Another term you're sure to hear often in French-speaking countries is mon chéri (said to men) and ma chérie (said to women).. The English word for “beauty” comes directly from French: la beauté .. And that word is…. You can use it exactly how you would use it in English.. So of course a post about love in French should include the word for friends!. All of the French translations of this word already have equivalents in English.. Don't ever say il/elle est chaud to describe a good-looking guy or girl.. Besides the French words and phrases listed above, there are other ways to express your love and affection.

written by Arie HeldermanFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?The first thing that baffles everyone who’s ever picked up a basic list of Russian words, is how to say “hello” in Russian…Здравствуйте – zdravstvuyteHow can something so basic, have four consonants following each other?I...

Just like in English, you can say the following Russian greetings whenever you meet a Russian person.. So some greetings are better used for your close friends, where others are only good in specific (formal) situations.. After every greeting I’ll quickly discuss what it means (literal meaning & English equivalent) and in which situations you can use it.. Even though it’s officially considered an informal way of saying hello, you can get away with in many cases.. When I’m in Russia, I basically make привет my default greeting.. Over time the meaning has switched to only hello, but it’s nice to know where it comes from as few foreigners will know this.. I don’t really recommend foreigners to use this mini version of привет, since it’s tough to get its usage right.. This is another trap in the land of Russian greetings (don’t worry, we’ll get to more safe words starting in a moment).. “Good morning” in Russian literally means “kind morning”.. As “good day” and “good evening” also follow this adjective plus noun combination.

written by Shannon KennedyFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Comment allez-vous ? – “How are you?”When it comes to greeting your fellow French speakers, there are many ways to ask how they’re doing.In this article, I’ll teach you how to ask someone how they are in French. That way...

That way, the next time you greet your French friends, you’ll be equipped with plenty of options beyond comment ça va ?. When you first crack open almost any French language learning resource, one of the first expressions you’ll learn is comment allez-vous?. The nice thing about comment allez-vous is that it's the most safe and polite of all greetings in French.. It’s not so informal that it should be reserved for friends and family, but it’s best to stick with either of the first two questions in explicitly formal situations.. This expression still means “how are you?” even though it literally translates as “it goes?”. This particular expression is used in formal situations or when asking more than one person.. When you want to ask your friend how they are and perhaps, more specifically how a certain situation or task is going, you might ask “ ça roule ?. ” for informal situations and when there is just one other person.. This is another typical reply to “how are you?”, especially when the question was phrased as “ comment ça va ?. This expression literally means “all goes well” and can be used to say “all good” in either formal or informal situations.

written by George JulianFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?The words café and résumé are originally French, and in English we often write those words without the accents. In French, however, the accent marks are not optional.French has several different accent marks, also known as...

The words café and résumé are originally French, and in English we often write those words without the accents.. So let's look at the different types of French accent and how they're used.. We'll cover all the different types of accent, how they're pronounced (if they're pronounced at all), and the effect they have on a word's grammar and/or meaning.. Let’s take a look at how to pronounce each of the five French accent marks.. The French “é” is the first of the two vowel sounds that make up the English “ay” diphthong.. Note that this is the only word in the entire French language where you'll find a grave accent above the letter “u”!. In French, the trema works the same way, and it's much more common than in English.. To type a vowel with a grave accent press Ctrl + ` , then the vowel.. Here's what you need to know for French:

written by Benny LewisFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Ever felt lost or unsure in a Spanish conversation?Everyone feels this way sometimes, but especially when learning a new language. There will be times when you don’t understand someone, you can’t keep up, or you just don’t k...

There will be times when you don’t understand someone, you can’t keep up, or you just don’t know how to answer.. It’s best to know how to express your lack of understanding by learning how to say “I don’t know” in Spanish.. In that case, you can say aun no se or todavía no lo séfor “I don’t know yet.” And if you’re not very confident in your answer, you can use the phrase *no lo sé con certeza for “I don’t know for sure.”. To admit you’re not following, you can say no entiendo for “I don’t understand” in Spanish.. So you admitted you don’t understand, and now you need to ask them to repeat what they said in Spanish.. To apologize for not understanding someone, you can say perdon no te entiendo (“sorry, I don’t understand you”).. You could even add on the time frame of how long you’ve been learning, like llevo tres meses aprendiendo español (“I’ve been learning Spanish for 3 months”).. You could also use this phrase with “I don’t know for sure.” Instead of no lo sé con certeza , which I shared above, you could use no lo sé con seguro .. Estoy seguro means “I’m sure,” just as lo sé means “I know.” And if you didn’t understand before but you do now, you can say ahora entiendo meaning “now I understand”.. To say “I don’t know how to say…” in Spanish, you use No se como decir… Then, add on what you don’t know how to say.. So, to say you don’t remember in Spanish, you could say both no recuerdo (“I don’t recall”) or no me acuerdo (“I don’t remember”).. Just remember the phrases themselves and worry about understanding the details of the grammar later as you learn more about pronouns and verbs.. Don’t worry about how much you know or don’t know.. Start learning how to make conversational chitchat in Spanish, and pick up small talk tips like learning about the weather in Spanish.

ContentsTable of contents1. My Favourite Way to Learn Spanish: Speaking From Day One2. Stop Speaking English! Study Spanish Through Immersion3. ... Read more

“What’s the best way to learn Spanish?”. It wasn't just that I started speaking Spanish as much as possible.. Related Learning: How to Find the Right Online Language Tutor for Your Language Classes. That means there's a lot of Spanish speakers who'd like to practise their English with you.. In many cities you can find “language exchange” events, where people from all over the world get together to speak and practise many languages together.

written by George JulianFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Planning on visiting a Portuguese-speaking country? Got a Portuguese friend, a Brazilian colleague or an Angolan love interest that you'd like to impress? Or do you just want to learn some basic Portuguese for the fun of i...

Bom dia literally means “good day” in Portuguese, but you'd only use it to say “good morning”.. Portuguese doesn't really distinguish between the “afternoon” and the “evening” like we do in English.. In English, “good morning” and “good afternoon” are only really used as greetings, while “good night” is what you'd say to someone at the end of the day right before they go to bed.. The Portuguese equivalents, however, are much more versatile – bom dia , boa tarde and boa noite can all mean both “hello” and “goodbye” in Portuguese.. Alô , borrowed from English, means “hello” in Portuguese.

written by Tamara MarieFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?When you think about the Spanish language and culture, you probably think about the running of the toros (bulls) in Spain or elegant women dancing the tango on the streets of Buenos Aires. Or maybe images of black and white...

This means if you’re going to turn on the radio or enjoy your favorite playlist, you may run across Caribbean Spanish words and phrases.. While there are regional differences even within the islands, there are many words and expressions that are used across most of the Caribbean.. Usually someone watching the cars on the street (comes from the English words “watch” and “man”).. Ayer esperé la guagua para San Juan por más de una hora.. Now that you’ve got some of the common Caribbean words down, let’s take a look at words that are unique to specific regions: namely Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic.. Mi puro cantaba son en los bares.. El papá de Enrique le dio un piñazo en la clase de boxeo.. El fufú es una comida difícil de encontrar en los restaurantes en Puerto Rico.. A person that is likes to be spoiled; someone that needs a lot of love and attention; a docile animal.. El jugo de parcha es muy bueno para bajar la presión.. La juntadera de esta noche es en casa de Juan – “The get together is at John´s”. El dominicano que no le guste el merengue que se revise.. There you have it, 51 Spanish words from the beautiful Caribbean.

written by Caitlin SacasasFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Japanese particles are teeny tiny bits of grammar, but they made a big impact on the clarity of your sentences. Learn Japanese particles, and you’ll have a solid foundation for Japanese grammar.But particles can seem so...

How do you know when to use は ( wa ) and が ( ga )?. Japanese particles are the “glue” that holds sentences together in Japanese.. We’ll answer all your questions about Japanese sentences and when to use particles, and teach you the most “must-know” particles as you get started with Japanese.. In Japanese, sentences look like this:. Particles are especially crucial to Japanese because Japanese sentences don’t use spaces.. So, when you’re reading a longer sentence, those particles help tell you where a word begins and ends, and what it’s role is in the sentence.. That’s why you need to look for the particles.. Want to know if you need a particle?. So you’ll get used to it in Japanese, too.. Since we don’t need watashi wa because it’s clear I’m talking about myself, then sushi actually becomes the subject of this sentence.. As you can see, this time に is marking “school” ( gakkou ) as the place we’re headed to ( itte imasu ).. We already talked about how が ( ga ) can be used as a particle to connect sentences with “but.”. Ikitai desu ka.を (wo)Direct object particleMarks the direct object that receives the action from the verb.晩ご飯を食べた。Bangohan wo tabeta.の (no)Possessive particleTurns a pronoun into a possessive form, “belonging to”, or generic noun “this one”さくらちゃんの猫。Sakura-chan no neko.に (ni)Movement, time and indirect object particleMeans “to”, “at”, or “for”学校に行っています。Gakkou ni itte imasu.へ (he)Directional particleMeaning “to” or “towards”学校へ行っています。Gakkou he itte imasu.も (mo)Inclusive particleMeans “also”, “too” or “both”私もスターウォーズが大好きです。Watashi mo suta-wozu ga daisuki desu.と (to)Connecting two objectsUsed as “and”犬と猫がかわいいね。Inu to neko ga kawaii ne.や (ya)Connecting two or more objects from an incomplete listUsed as “and” for an incomplete list of examples犬や猫やうさぎがかわいいね。Inu ya neko ya usagi ga kawaii ne.でも (demo)“But”Stronger than が, and used for emphasis昨日は夕食が本当に好きでした。でも、この食事は最高です!Kinou wa yuushoku ga hontou ni suki deshita.

written by Benny LewisFull disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. ?Ah, Spanish verb conjugations.For many Spanish learners, conjugations are one of the trickiest parts of the language to get used to.Verb conjugation in Spanish often seems unpredictable, with few rules to follow. That’s beca...

In this article, I’ll focus on the three main Spanish verb tenses for regular verbs: present, past and future.. First things first: there are three classes of Spanish verbs: -ar verbs, -er verbs, and -ir verbs.. So to understand where to begin conjugating, you need to identify what kind of verb ending it has in its infinitive form, and what the stem of the verb is.. Since it’s a -er verb, it keeps the “e” in all but the yo conjugation – just like -ar verbs.. One thing to note: while the “we” form of the verb is the same as present tense for -ar and -ir verbs, they change slightly with -er verbs.

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Laurine Ryan

Last Updated: 06/12/2022

Views: 6774

Rating: 4.7 / 5 (77 voted)

Reviews: 92% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Laurine Ryan

Birthday: 1994-12-23

Address: Suite 751 871 Lissette Throughway, West Kittie, NH 41603

Phone: +2366831109631

Job: Sales Producer

Hobby: Creative writing, Motor sports, Do it yourself, Skateboarding, Coffee roasting, Calligraphy, Stand-up comedy

Introduction: My name is Laurine Ryan, I am a adorable, fair, graceful, spotless, gorgeous, homely, cooperative person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.